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  1. #1

    newbie question: backhand

    How do you correctly hit a back hand? Each time I hit with backhand, I lose control of the ball.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    14
    early preparation use your spare hand to assist as you change to backhand grip this helps you get sideways as well ,step forward into the backhand with a almost straght arm ; a slice is best under pressure use topspin if you have lots of time alway aim high above the net as this will give you more depth and a safety margin.
    practice your footwork use small quick steps and keep your eyes on the ball,also keep you head steady and your wrist firm at the moment of impact

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    36

    get it back!

    As Kiwi said -- get your racquet back early! Don't think, "I can run around this and hit a forehand." Be confident and prepare for the shot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by tenista
    As Kiwi said -- get your racquet back early! Don't think, "I can run around this and hit a forehand." Be confident and prepare for the shot.
    Getting the racquet back isn't always top priority. Just let it be natural. If you watch some of the top pros on TV, they usually bring their racquet back just before they hit it to make it less mechanical and more natural. Focus on aiming the ball. It may sound simple, but it works.
    4.5-5.0
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    36

    which pros?

    Quote Originally Posted by thewh00sel
    Getting the racquet back isn't always top priority. Just let it be natural. If you watch some of the top pros on TV, they usually bring their racquet back just before they hit it to make it less mechanical and more natural. Focus on aiming the ball. It may sound simple, but it works.
    I'm not sure I've seen many pros with late preparation. If you watch Agassi, Federer, Hewitt, Sharapova, Serena (some of the best backhands, in my opinion), they all have their racquets back by the time the ball bounces, if not well before.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by tenista
    I'm not sure I've seen many pros with late preparation. If you watch Agassi, Federer, Hewitt, Sharapova, Serena (some of the best backhands, in my opinion), they all have their racquets back by the time the ball bounces, if not well before.
    Nothing's more awkward than running around with your racquet back to hit a backhand. Most pros have their racquet back by the time it bounces, yes, but not as soon as they know it's going to be a backhand. Bring it back when you know you have enough time to bring it forward again with power. Not too difficult.
    4.5-5.0
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  7. #7

    Post backhand

    When I played in college, I learned that my right hand was not the hand I needed to use the most in my backhand. If you are right handed, then try hitting some left handed forehands. I know it will feel weird at first but trust me, it works. After you do that, then start putting your right hand on the racquet and put more power behind it. You will notice that this drill helps you learn how to guide your shot. Hope it helps.

  8. #8

    Smile

    I guess one of the questions that no one has really bothered asking is: Do you hit a 1-hand backhand? or a 2-hsnd backhand. Personally, I'm a one-hander, so I could only comment from my own expereince.

    Just like almost all posts said, you really should prepare early. The earlier you're set, the better. However, just because you know the next shot's gonna be a backhand, doesn't mean you should quickly switch to the preparation stance. You really should move into position, before you bring your racquet backwards. Trying to run to across the court with a racquet in your backhand position would be really awkward.

    Also, your center of gravity should be slightly lower than usual, so you should really bend your knees. Lowering your center of gravity, allows you to brush up on the ball, thus increasing the amount of topspin you get on your backhand.

    Other than those few points, the other advices stated is equally, if not more important. After all these things, most importantly, you should practice it! Let's face it, no one learns a new stroke in a day.... just work towards and and you'll do great!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    36

    good info!

    Quote Originally Posted by saikit
    I guess one of the questions that no one has really bothered asking is: Do you hit a 1-hand backhand? or a 2-hsnd backhand. Personally, I'm a one-hander, so I could only comment from my own expereince.

    Just like almost all posts said, you really should prepare early. The earlier you're set, the better. However, just because you know the next shot's gonna be a backhand, doesn't mean you should quickly switch to the preparation stance. You really should move into position, before you bring your racquet backwards. Trying to run to across the court with a racquet in your backhand position would be really awkward.

    Also, your center of gravity should be slightly lower than usual, so you should really bend your knees. Lowering your center of gravity, allows you to brush up on the ball, thus increasing the amount of topspin you get on your backhand.

    Other than those few points, the other advices stated is equally, if not more important. After all these things, most importantly, you should practice it! Let's face it, no one learns a new stroke in a day.... just work towards and and you'll do great!
    That's good advice, especially about staying low. However, let me pose a question - why do so many players relish sending their opponents wide on their backhand side? Because they know they won't be prepared to do anything other than chip or slice the return, setting you up an easy winner. Why? Because they are still holding the racquet on their forehand side. Trust me, you can run just as fast with the racquet poised at your middle, and you will seem quicker because you'll be able to rip a backhand winner crosscourt or down the line. Watch Federer - he does it all the time.

  10. #10
    Ambience Guest
    Stay low, make sure to plant your feet if you can. Bend knees and swing. Your racquet face should be in the middle, not closed, but not open. This is for single-handed backhands though.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15

    Late preparation is the kiss of death!

    Anyone out there that thinks you don't have to prepare reletivily early, especially 3.5 up to the pro level tennis flat out is missleading you with bad information. 78 feet is the distance from baseline to baseline. Any ball hit with any solid pace will end up on your racquet in 1.5 seconds or less, probably closer to one second. In that time you need to move your body as you turn and get the racquet back, evaluate the flight path of the ball in order to set the racquet on the proper swing plane, determine shot selection, weight transfer forward and account for the time it takes to get the racquet from backswing to point of contact. Not preparing early is one of the sins of tennis, it is main reason why amature players that don't prepare properly allways look like they are in panic mode, thus many unforced errors. If you have a one handed backhand and don't prepare very early you are screwed! We are built for wrist strength on the forehand side making it easier to make up a late mistake, but comming across the body on the one handed backhand, there is no wrist strength to make up a late hit. I am a former ATP touring Pro / Head club professional and if I made a habit of not preparing as soon as it entered my mind what side the ball was on, the opponent would be all over me like a Hobo on a ham sandwhich! tprocurt@tampabay.rr.com
    Last edited by Tprocurt; 09-24-2005 at 12:32 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    21
    you know when your backhand feels good and natural as you get older and become more experienced in tennis, you just need to know the basic. coaches actually teach different type of backhand even though they aim for the same result. as posted previouslly backhand needs early preparation, good foot work, stay low and swing through the ball! the william sisters do this best!

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