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  1. #16
    Unregistered Guest

    Smile Reasons why I use two handed forehand

    Oh, I forgot to mention that the reasons why I use the two handed backhands:
    1. I get very wristy - my coach and all my opponents tell me that. My opponents would say "just hit to his forehand side and get errors from him!".
    2. I used to get mucle aches on my forearm - near "tennis elbow" area when I use the one handed forehand.
    3. More power - I'm not physically strong. I can hit difficult passing shots much better than when I used a one handed forehand.
    4. More control - I can place the ball better

    Good Luck,

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    36

    effective, but difficult

    Many years ago, I played against a terrific player named Ron Holmberg, who hit two-handed from both sides. He went on to a successful pro career, but back then guys were playing with wood racquets.

    The velocity men hit with today would require you to be extremely quick, because your reach is reduced with a two-handed stroke. Players with only one two-handed stroke can cheat a bit, but if that's all you have from both wings, you've limited your chances at getting to those angles.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    atco nj usa
    Posts
    2
    i also hit cross handed two handed forehand. my only real problems are trying to reach really wide shots and trying to set land speed records with it.
    i hit a few good ones then keep hitting harder and harder until i almost black out. it sure is fun.

  4. #19
    gay player Guest

    Wink two hand forehand

    My two handed backhand gives me a great comfort and control plus power, and I have no problem to turn my waist when hitting a down the line or cross shot, I just wonder if you guys have any problem or discomfort when doing the same to two hand forehand as you will have to turn your waist like you do to the backhand side right?? I want to learn two handed forehand as I have a big problem on my single hand forehand , lack of control and power.

  5. #20
    Unregistered Guest

    Problem with the two-handed forehand

    Hey guys,
    I used a two-handed forehand in a match against a hard-hitter the other day, but it didn't reached further than the net and the service line and the bounce was too high. Do you have any suggestions, maybe I have to use more power??
    I'm sorry my english isn't very well but I'm from Belgium(you all know Belgium I guess from Henin-Hardenne and Clijsters).
    Bye

  6. #21
    Well, never say "never." But the two-handed forehand is rare because there are problems with it. It's not just the mirror image of a two-handed backhand, because your dominant arm is the one in back on the forehand side, not the one in front, as on the backhand side. This is why there's no established way to best grip the racket. Some players cross their arms, most don't. Either way you do it has drawbacks.

    Having the limited reach of a two-handed stroke on both sides would give a lot of court away, too.

    So, I would think it over long and hard before switching to a two-handed forehand.

    On the other hand, there are advantages. They just don't usually outweigh the disadvantages of the more versatile one-handed stroke.

  7. #22
    zubiefan Guest

    use it and luv it

    I have used a two-fisted grip on both sides for years and i love it. If you trully know how to use it you will find that the advantages outweighs the disadvantages. One of the things i love most about it is that similar to a two-fisted backhand, it is well disguised. My natural shot is cross-court, but when the opportunity presents itself, i will turn my shoulder, step into the shot, and send it right down the line. I have wronged footed my opponent quite often due to them cheating on my cross court shot.

    Some here believe that a two-fisted forehand is a disadvantage when playing against an opponent who hits with pace. That is where your mental toughness comes-in. Slow the game down mentally, set-up for every shot, and MOST IMPORTANTLY, "GET THAT RAQUET HEAD BACK". As soon as you see the ball off of your opponents raquet, you should already know whether it is to your forehand or backhand. Whichever side is going, your raquet head should be in that position. This is very helpful when playing against an opponent that hits the ball with pace. Personally, I love pace.

  8. #23
    Unregistered Guest
    I used to play with a two handed forehand, but it's easy for the opponent to know if you are going to hit the forehand or the backhand, especially when he serves.
    Also if you a right hander,the riht hand will be on the top of the grip for the forehand unlike the backhand.

  9. #24
    Unregistered Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Tprocurt
    The two handed forehand is obviously a rare stroke style, however if your successful, go for it! But remember, only a handfull of successful ATP pros have used it over many years so that should tell you something. If this type of stroke was all that, and had a whole lot to offer, there would be many more people doing it and pros teaching it! If you are injured and it is the only thing that helps, its better than giving up the game. Rock on!
    The comment that the two-handed forehand is a 'rare stroke'...is no different than what was seen and said about the two-handed backhand in the early 70's... Jack Kramer said the two-handed backhand was a shot that robs you of power and gives your opponent a psychological advantage.

    However, today there are more two-handed forehand players on tour than there have been in the history of the game combined! Seles proved it didn't prevent her from reaching number one in the world; Gene Mayer was a top 5 world-ranked doubles and singles player, and we now have a number of pros in the top 200 in the world who use the shot. In addition, there are a ton of up-and-coming juniors with national and state rankings using the shot.

    So, needless to say, it isn't a shot that is detramental for many. The reason we don't see a lot of pros using the shot is the same reason that we didn't see a lot of two-handed backhand players emerge after Borg won the French at 17. It would take a lot of pros to buy into the shot, learn how to teach it, and then get enough athletes with the right mind and physical attributes to get ranked and into the top levels. We are seeing that exact transition now with the two-handed forehand. Believe me, there were a lot of naysayers about the two-handed backhand too! The shot is not necessary for everyone, nor for most. But, it is a fantastic tool for learning many concepts and components for hitting a forehand well.

  10. #25
    Unregistered Guest
    Monica Seles won 9 grand slams with two handed forehands and backhands. So, this really proves that the two handed method does work. I'm not sure if you remembered that Seles two handed strokes were so potent that Steffi Graf couldn't handle her pace.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    ST LOUIS
    Posts
    1

    It works for me

    I always had trouble with my forehand when I was younger. I finally gave up playing tennis for 20 years. Now I've started playing again and discovered the two handed forehand. Perfecting it has given me power and control over my shots. I'm able to place the ball where I want on the court, and with the speed and spin that I choose. I have to play with a two handed forehand, because without it I have no control over the ball. The two handed forehand really works for me. I perfected it using a tennis ball machine and lots of practice until it felt natural. I'm very pleased with the outcome. Furthermore, I continue to improve my tennis game, which is important to me. Next I am going to perfect the two handed back hand.

  12. #27
    The two-handed forehand isn't the mirror image of the two-handed backhand.

    For a two-handed backhand, you put your right hand (assuming you're right-handed) at the bottom of the handle in a Continental or Eastern backhand grip. This allows you to let go and hit one-handed if necessary. You place your left hand on the handle in whatever grip is comfortable. The left hand drives the racket through, doing 70-80% of the work.

    For a two-handed forehand, you should put your dominant right hand at the bottom in a forehand grip so you can let go and hit one-handed if necessary. But that means that your left hand goes above it. That makes you tend to pull the racket with left hand, instead of drive it with the right. This grip also doesn't feel natural. Imagine trying to swing a baseball bat that way - with the right hand at the bottom and the left hand above it.

    So, many players hit the two-handed forehand with the left hand at the bottom. They are out of luck if the shot is out of two-handed reach.

    These are the reasons why the two-handed backhand is common, but the two-handed forehand isn't generally recommended. That said, if it helps your game, and you don't think it worth the time it would take to master the one-handed shot, go for it. Be aware of its limitations though. It really does affect your reach. And not just to the side, but in every direction.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    11

    i do

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I am looking for infromation on two-handed forhands. Due to some trouble with my wrist, I think this would add more power to my very week returns. I use a two handed back hand but not sure how to add the second had to the forhand. Any ideas?
    i used single for a while but don't feel very comfortable. i am left handed (writing) but stronger at throwing etc with my right, slightly ambi dextrous so i find it more natural to use double hands both sides. if you move your wrists in preparation for a shot you get some great angles. so i used my right hand to hold the racket and left to support by gripping the throat

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    The comment that the two-handed forehand is a 'rare stroke'...is no different than what was seen and said about the two-handed backhand in the early 70's... Jack Kramer said the two-handed backhand was a shot that robs you of power and gives your opponent a psychological advantage.

    However, today there are more two-handed forehand players on tour than there have been in the history of the game combined! Seles proved it didn't prevent her from reaching number one in the world; Gene Mayer was a top 5 world-ranked doubles and singles player, and we now have a number of pros in the top 200 in the world who use the shot. In addition, there are a ton of up-and-coming juniors with national and state rankings using the shot.

    So, needless to say, it isn't a shot that is detramental for many. The reason we don't see a lot of pros using the shot is the same reason that we didn't see a lot of two-handed backhand players emerge after Borg won the French at 17. It would take a lot of pros to buy into the shot, learn how to teach it, and then get enough athletes with the right mind and physical attributes to get ranked and into the top levels. We are seeing that exact transition now with the two-handed forehand. Believe me, there were a lot of naysayers about the two-handed backhand too! The shot is not necessary for everyone, nor for most. But, it is a fantastic tool for learning many concepts and components for hitting a forehand well.
    Well, in general principle, I wouldn't disagree with you, but in this case there are solid reasons for the conventional wisdom.

    More often than not, however, you'd be exactly right. My pet peeve is these go-around-come-around lines that say you must do this or that in tennis. Everybody goes, "Yup, yup, yup" and sucks it up, just because a famous person probably first said it. These cliches become "true" only because they get repeated ten billion times. No one ever dares to notice that they don't even make sense.

    One of my favorite ones is the one that says you're supposed to immediately point up at a lob, cock your racket back over your shoulder, and - maintaining this awkward pose - move back under the lob to hit an overhead. The pros who tell you to do this don't do it themselves when they hit overheads! Why? Because it's totally clumbsy. And it doesn't do diddly to keep you from STARTING your swing late.

    There's way too much monkey-see-monkey-do in tennis. But just because some things taught are wrong doesn't mean all things taught are wrong. I don't know why so many people resort to the invalid support of "who-said-it" instead of giving REASONS for believing a thing. But the unreason can go the other way too. Just because someone was wrong about something doesn't make everything he says worthless. I'm always suspicious of things people say without giving any logical reasons it - but rather acting as though boosting or attacking some proponent's credibility is a legitimate argument.

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