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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Thumbs up What makes Nadal superior

    Anybody having any thoughts about this subject?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    karnataka, india
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    2
    his speed

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    karnataka, india
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    2
    and his heart to will the matches

  4. #4

    Oscar Wegner On Nadal

    His fighting temper and his huge topspin, which makes everyone else uncomfortable. Check Oscar Wegner (www.tennisteacher.com), who put these techniques in Spain in the 1970s.

    Predict who will win the US Open and win a prize. For details see US Open Predictions on the Modern Tennis Methodology Forum.
    Last edited by Tennis Angel; 08-20-2008 at 04:25 PM.

  5. #5
    Nadal isn't necessarily superior! He's amazing, no doubt and all the points mentioned above are true as well, BUT I think people have a very short termed memory which has been the cause of the downfall in the popularity of a lot of celebrities be it athletes, movie stars, rock stars etc. People seem to forget that Rafa is only 21-22 yrs old and Federer is 27. I would like to hear this comment about Roger when he was 21-22 and annihilating every tennis player in grand fashion. He's had a bad year and it broke my heart to see him play well below his potential and sometimes even amateurish, including in the US Open despite his straight set victory. The way he struggled against Igor Andreev and Mueller (despite his straight set win) I was sure he'll lose to Djokovic in the Semis but all these guys are kids and new and have that fire that Roger had 6-7 yrs ago when he dominated the tennis circuit. It is a privilege to have been alive at that time to watch him play. And the same people who said that about him are now making all these comments about him on public forums. Quite sad!

  6. #6

    Nadal is #1

    I think Nadal's secret to his #1 status is his Uber Training!
    He has taken tennis to a new level by training and focusing on all surfaces and using cross training on a physical level. He will be the ultimate dominator of the sport!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    UK - Surrey
    Posts
    166
    Hard work, fitness and loving his sport, being a gentleman at all times and respecting all of his oponents.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Noog, TN
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by lordvader View Post
    People seem to forget that Rafa is only 21-22 yrs old and Federer is 27. I would like to hear this comment about Roger when he was 21-22 and annihilating every tennis player in grand fashion.

    This is faulty logic, because Fed hadn't become remotely as dominant as Nadal at 21/22. Roger won his first major at Wimbledon in 2003 when he was 21 (almost 22, birthday in early August). By the same age Rafa had already won three.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    703
    Aside from Rafael's amazing stroke production which is very difficult to deal with, there's one aspect to his game that I particularly admire and is what I tell my kids each time we have practice:

    1. The points' not over until it's over.
    You'd be amazed at how many balls you can get to in enough time to produce a suitable reply if you're in good physical condition and capable of making very quick decisions to move your body.

    2. Play each & every point to Win. Concentration & Focus on the task at hand from the moment you either serve or return serve, will give you the best opportunity to win the point. Sometimes Players have a tendency of returning balls directly back to their opponent while supposedly constructing a point. I have to once again share to wisdom of an old timer I knew who always said to me, "Hit it where they ain't"

    3. No Guts - No Glory And this is the old 'Go For Your Shots' statement. Maybe old, maybe out dated but still it says a lot. At the end of the day when you sit back and analyze your performance, did you hit the shots you're capable of, or did you choke up for fear of making a mistake?

    To echo other comments here, Ivan Lendl proved the necessity for fitness during his run as the best in the World. Todays Professional Tennis Career is no walk in the park, it's year around training & conditioning if you intend to be the best you can be. Rafael Nadal is a prime example of this concept. When he dominated the Red Clay, I heard the comments about him only being a Clay Court Specialist but thanks to his Uncle, who was convinced his student had the skills to dominate on all court surface, they put together a plan as Howie mentioned:
    Quote Originally Posted by Howie
    He has taken tennis to a new level by training and focusing on all surfaces and using cross training on a physical level.
    Still the DecoTurf of the US Open and the Plexicushion of the Australian Open are presenting a challenge for Nadal mainly due to the speed & bounce.
    Personally, I was amazed to see him do so well at Wimbledon and I will admit, I was one of the Nay Sayers when he made his first run at the All England Club. Lastly, I believe Roger Federer is still better suited for grass and should they meet again in the Wimbledon Finals, I firmly believe Federer should prevail.
    The only acceptable loss is when your opponent was better than you on that given day.
    It is never acceptable to lose when your opponent was not.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sea Pines, Hilton Head, South Carolina
    Posts
    414
    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    Aside from Rafael's amazing stroke production which is very difficult to deal with, there's one aspect to his game that I particularly admire and is what I tell my kids each time we have practice:

    1. The points' not over until it's over.
    You'd be amazed at how many balls you can get to in enough time to produce a suitable reply if you're in good physical condition and capable of making very quick decisions to move your body.

    2. Play each & every point to Win. Concentration & Focus on the task at hand from the moment you either serve or return serve, will give you the best opportunity to win the point. Sometimes Players have a tendency of returning balls directly back to their opponent while supposedly constructing a point. I have to once again share to wisdom of an old timer I knew who always said to me, "Hit it where they ain't"

    3. No Guts - No Glory And this is the old 'Go For Your Shots' statement. Maybe old, maybe out dated but still it says a lot. At the end of the day when you sit back and analyze your performance, did you hit the shots you're capable of, or did you choke up for fear of making a mistake?

    To echo other comments here, Ivan Lendl proved the necessity for fitness during his run as the best in the World. Todays Professional Tennis Career is no walk in the park, it's year around training & conditioning if you intend to be the best you can be. Rafael Nadal is a prime example of this concept. When he dominated the Red Clay, I heard the comments about him only being a Clay Court Specialist but thanks to his Uncle, who was convinced his student had the skills to dominate on all court surface, they put together a plan as Howie mentioned:


    Still the DecoTurf of the US Open and the Plexicushion of the Australian Open are presenting a challenge for Nadal mainly due to the speed & bounce.
    Personally, I was amazed to see him do so well at Wimbledon and I will admit, I was one of the Nay Sayers when he made his first run at the All England Club. Lastly, I believe Roger Federer is still better suited for grass and should they meet again in the Wimbledon Finals, I firmly believe Federer should prevail.
    Good call Coach. You nailed it. People don't seem to understand the intense training it takes to reach the level these guys are at. My former coach, Lawson Duncan, used to train with Lendl before the French and U.S. Opens and he said it nearly killed him everytime. Believe me, Lawson didn't make it into the top 50 by being a push over. The guys who take it that one step further and make it to the top are a special breed. Federer has been doing it for years now. And, don't forget, he was the #1 Junior player in the world as well. He had an entire career of junior tennis before he ever made it into the pros. Federer has a "good excuse" for being a little tired. There was a guy named Thomas Muster who was just about as dominant on clay as Rafa is, but his competition was much tougher than Rafa's. In fact, Muster in his prime versus Rafa now would have been out and out war. I have no doubt that the Moose would have taken 4 or 5 out of ten matches from Rafa on clay. I don't think Rafa would argue that point either........The competition out there is fierce to say the least.....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    There was a guy named Thomas Muster who was just about as dominant on clay as Rafa is, but his competition was much tougher than Rafa's. In fact, Muster in his prime versus Rafa now would have been out and out war. I have no doubt that the Moose would have taken 4 or 5 out of ten matches from Rafa on clay. I don't think Rafa would argue that point either........The competition out there is fierce to say the least.....
    I know the Moose Man very well and I've made mention of his unfortunate accident in Florida where he was struck by a drunk driver prior to a Finals Match against Ivan Lendl (can't recall the year but it was probably in the early 90's) Lendl got a walkover in the Finals although he did play an exhibition match against with I'm thinking Serguso who was one of the USA's #1 Doubles Team at the time.

    Anyway, as a result of that accident Tomas made a decision to not lay down licking his wounds, crying in his beer about what could have been, this guy began a work regime to make anyone cringe. They constructed a platform for which he sat on and hit forehand and backhand shots in a stationary position. Later after his legs healed enough for him to run around a bit, he started playing exclusively on Clay because of the cushion it gave him on his joints.

    Tomas Muster became so committed to his quest to get back that he not only began competing again but on Clay, became the best in the World and subsequently became #1 in the World because of all his back to back Clay Court Tournament wins.

    Sadly the rest of the Tour gave him a lot of heat because he amounted enough points on Clay to become #1 and didn't play on Harder surfaces.

    Shortly after however he did attempt to compete on Hardcourt surfaces but didn't do as well. I loved Tomas with that low well-bottom voice of his but a fantastic guy and I'm glad you mentioned his name for us older members

    Coach
    The only acceptable loss is when your opponent was better than you on that given day.
    It is never acceptable to lose when your opponent was not.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sea Pines, Hilton Head, South Carolina
    Posts
    414
    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    I know the Moose Man very well and I've made mention of his unfortunate accident in Florida where he was struck by a drunk driver prior to a Finals Match against Ivan Lendl (can't recall the year but it was probably in the early 90's) Lendl got a walkover in the Finals although he did play an exhibition match against with I'm thinking Serguso who was one of the USA's #1 Doubles Team at the time.

    Anyway, as a result of that accident Tomas made a decision to not lay down licking his wounds, crying in his beer about what could have been, this guy began a work regime to make anyone cringe. They constructed a platform for which he sat on and hit forehand and backhand shots in a stationary position. Later after his legs healed enough for him to run around a bit, he started playing exclusively on Clay because of the cushion it gave him on his joints.

    Tomas Muster became so committed to his quest to get back that he not only began competing again but on Clay, became the best in the World and subsequently became #1 in the World because of all his back to back Clay Court Tournament wins.

    Sadly the rest of the Tour gave him a lot of heat because he amounted enough points on Clay to become #1 and didn't play on Harder surfaces.

    Shortly after however he did attempt to compete on Hardcourt surfaces but didn't do as well. I loved Tomas with that low well-bottom voice of his but a fantastic guy and I'm glad you mentioned his name for us older members

    Coach
    He was quite a player. It was 1989 when he beat Yannick Noah in the semis after being down two sets to none on.....you guessed it....hardcourts at the Lipton over in Miami. Lendl played the second best Swiss player ever in the final since Muster was in the hospital. A guy named Jakob Hlasek. Hlasek actually won that match. That guy was quite good. Ah, the old days. I remember that chair. His coach, Ronnie Leitgeb, disappeared from the scene didn't he? Muster was actually quite good on hardcourts, but his smashed knee couldn't have lasted like it did had he played a full hardcourt schedule. I watched him beat Sampras at the end of the year chammpionships in Munich back in '95 though. I am going to have to visit youtube to watch some old matches in a few!

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