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View Poll Results: Is It Possible to Define the Essence of Tennis in Comprehensive and Concise way?

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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennis Angel View Post
    There is a fundamental similarity between martial arts and tennis. It is the "secret ingredient" which is so simple, but which most players and coaches fail to recognize. Once understood it unlocks the mystery of how the pros play with such force and speed. It can be applied to anyone's game to create phenomenal results and free him to play like the pros.
    I was going to say that

    If there is one philosophy that I've tried to instill in my kids, it is to K.I.S. (Keep It Simple) don't complicate your movements or your game. Even though the ball is coming at you in a quickened pace, doesn't mean you need to panic. Calmness & control weigh heavy in Tennis. We practice strokes and foot work but far few practice thinking on court. For most situations there is a solution. Remember Tennis is a series of emergencies that we face that must be dealt with. If you find yourself tensing up whenever a ball is coming at you, you're doing it wrong. A friend of mine told me something many years back, he said, "In Tennis when that guy is standing at the Net, you have three options, right - left & over. Your only challenge is to decide which one is the best at that moment"

    Coach



    .
    The only acceptable loss is when your opponent was better than you on that given day.
    It is never acceptable to lose when your opponent was not.

  2. #32
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    Yikes! I am feeling a movie screenplay coming on! Jean Claude Van Damm as a tennis player. He goes up against Federer and just as Van Damm is about to lose, he meditates and finds Zen (and Barbara Streisand screams from the crowd in ecstasy). Van Damm then changes into clothing specially made by Nike that resembles the clothing worn by David Carradine in Kung Fu and absolutely runs through Federer. Final score: 0-6, 0-6, 6-0, 6-0, 6-0. Van Damm with the most miraculous comeback ever. His final winner is in slow motion and he holds his positon as he lets out his famous gutteral eeeyahhhhhh!

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennis Angel View Post
    This is an interesting conversation and many things Bubo writes are well stated. I must, however, disagree with the precept that tennis is difficult and complicated. To the contrary, when one understands the essence of tennis it is incredibly simple - to comprehend and to execute. It is false data and lack of awareness which causes complexity and difficulty.

    This is paradox because so far nobody came even close to define the essence of tennis.This can only mean that because of tennis complexity it is difficult to define its substance in comprehensive and concise way , that we all are very superficial about tennis or both.

    Even once when tennis substance is defined no one who plays or try to learn how to play tennis will never say that tennis is not difficult and complicated.Why is then important to define its substance?So that one can distinguish between important and less important things;in other words by learning the essence of tennis one will get the base on which he/she will be able to built on for the rest of his/her tennis life.



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    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-26-2009 at 03:16 AM.

  4. #34
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    Path to professional tennis is long and difficult so its of tremendous importance that each part of the game is attended with highest quality.

    First one who will leave the race are the ones who are deficient in tennis technique, next who are not physically well prepared.At the end will stay the ones who are very good in previous two components.Mental component will make difference between them.

    This is the essence of tennis, too.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-16-2009 at 08:51 AM.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    Path to professional tennis is long and difficult so its of tremendous importance that each part of the game is attended with highest quality.

    First one who will leave the race are the ones who are deficient in tennis technique, next who are not physically well prepared.At the end will stay the ones who are very good in previous two components.Mental component will make difference between them.

    This is the essence of tennis, too.
    In order to make it in professional tennis, technique and physical preparation has to be there early on. All of the pros have good technique and strong physical attributes. However, once they get to that level, it is all mental. All mental. The ability to stay down on the ball when you have to hit a match point passing shot is all mental in the pros. If they didn't have the physical and technical ability, they wouldn't be there. Knowing where to be and where the next shot must be hit is a mental thing. Being able to deal with fear is a mental thing. Being able to bounce back from a tough loss is a mental thing. The physical training and the technical training is a cake walk. It's the mind that separates the great from the good.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    In order to make it in professional tennis, technique and physical preparation has to be there early on.
    Very oversimplified view.One (girl/boy) if she/he does not have good technique will represent nothing on local level by the time he/she is 14 years old.It must be understood that the name of the game is tennis and one has to be very skillful in tennis technique very early to be able to make progress on the competitive ladder which leads to professional tennis.If one does not the game is over even before junior competition.



    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-16-2009 at 08:52 AM.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    In order to make it in professional tennis, technique and physical preparation has to be there early on.
    It is very logical that the first ones who leave the race are the ones who do not posses sound technique.There are at least two reason for logical explanation:

    -the name of the game is tennis, and tennis skills differ this game from any other game

    - this is period when certain physical categories are not represented (maximal strength, power, anareboc endurance) because of bilogical development of a child.

    Once a player reaches puberty, he/she can endure more intensive practices, and develop these physical categories which when developed earlier would have contraproductive effect on player¨s health.

    At that point one who does not develop these physical categories will fall behind, and eventually will lagg so much behind that he/she will be out of race.

    I will state my personal example.I paid very much attention to tennis technique, but not enough to physical development.What happened!In 1997 my player played against Vera Zvonarjeva under 14 and lost 5/7 in third (Vera saved 3 match points), in 1998 my player lost in three sets, in 1999 my player lost in straight sets.

    At the time I did not know what was going on, but later I figured out.Vera was not technically better, but physically stronger so she could use her tennis technique.My player could not as a consequence of physical deficiencies.

    So, once when one survived first elimination by developing sound technique, next problem will appear at the time when player is physicaly developed, but not physically well conditioned.This lack of proper conditioning will eliminate him from race or it will not enable him/her to acomplish what could be acomplished based on proficiencies of tennis skills.

    Here, does not mean that at this point tennis technique development will stop.If tennis technique has sound base there is limitless potential to develop.The same thing with physical conditioning.Physical conditioning starts at the time when one starts to play tennis according to biological development.After puberty body is ready for intensive physical conditioning which would be detrimental if done before.

    This is the essence of tennis too, and one can see that it is not easy at all as some readers commented.I spent 16 years working with one player, and at the time some of these was not clear to me,too.I made some very good decisions, but I made decisions which I would not make with today¨s knowledge and experience.The problem is just that at that level there are very few people one can ask for advice, and they are very hard to reach.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-16-2009 at 08:52 AM.

  8. #38
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    I wouldn't say that I oversimplified it. I just believe that the players who are sound of mind tend to excel. Example, I ran a 4.41 40 yard dash and stayed in that range consistently. I also could squat 315 pounds and bench press 265 lbs. My technique was very, very sound and the best I did was a world ranking of 403 back in 1995 after 2.5 years on the tour. I had a heat stroke grant it and that was the end of my career. Maybe I could have gone a bit higher had I not had the heat stroke, but my biggest problem was in my head. I had a horrible temper. A horrible, horrible temper. It helped me lose matches I should have won. I have seen players without great physical attributes win numerous matches and there was no worse technique in the world than Stefan Edberg's forehand and Boris Becker's eastern to semi-western forehand service grip, but those two had it in the mental ability. I truly feel it is the mental game that makes or breaks a player. I have seen numerous juniors with all the physical attributes in the world lose to much lesser players because the weaker player had more determination and refused to quit. Tennis is a game of attrition in which the player not only must play an opponent, but must be able to conquer their own inner fears. Mats Wilander won 3 Grand Slams in 1988 and then fell out of game. Was it because his technique went bad or he was not in shape enough or physically talented enough. Heck, the guy just about won the Grand Slam that year. His mind gave out and that was the end of him. Kaputt. The essence of tennis is up to the person who is pondering the question "What is the essence of tennis". It may be one thing to one person and something totally different to another. It all depends on the perception of that person. Many people think tennis is stupid. Many people think tennis is great. There is no right or wrong answer.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    Knowing where to be and where the next shot must be hit is a mental thing.
    This has nothing to do with mental.This is pure tactics, and experience of playing against certain player.

    One after hiting a shot to the opponent must:

    - return to the middle of a court or,
    - go to middle of opponent¨s the furthest possible balls he can hit or
    - go to the net

    This is general tactical policy which a player may adjust based on experience he has by playing against this particular opponent.



    The same is with where next shot must be hit.It has nothing to do with mental;it is all tactics and previous experinece one has if he has already played against particular opponent.
    Where one will hit the ball depends on phases of play (defense, attack, rally etc.), and positioning of an opponent (at the net, at the baseline, no män¨s land).


    This is the essence of tennis.too.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-16-2009 at 08:53 AM.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    Being able to deal with fear is a mental thing. Being able to bounce back from a tough loss is a mental thing.

    On this one, I fully agree with you.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-16-2009 at 08:53 AM.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    This has nothing to do with mental.This is pure tactics, and experience of playing against certain player.

    One after hiting a shot to the opponent must:

    - return to the middle of a court or,
    - go to middle of opponent¨s the furthest possible balls or
    - go to the net

    This is general tactical policy which a player may adjust based on experience he has by playing against this particular opponent.



    The same is with where next shot must be hit.It has nothing to do with mental;it is all tactics and previous experinece one has if he has already played against particular opponent.
    Where one will hit the ball depends on phases of play (defense, attack, rally etc.), and positioning of an opponent (at the net, at the baseline, no män¨s land).


    This is the essence of tennis.too.
    Sorry, but a player must use his/her mind to employ tactics. I've been there. I had a top 500 in the world ranking. I understand the game. It comes down to the mind in the end. If a player had to think of all of the things that you write here in a split second, they would absolutely lose every match they played. Analysis paralysis. I don't buy it. Our "essences" don't correlate. I believe a player must play their game in order to be good. You have to make minor adjustments when playing different opponents. However, you hit your same forehands and same backhands etc. I guess we all have our different opinions on the matter. Tactics and technique are very, very important, but in the end, if the player doesn't have the mental game, they will lose. Ask Phillipousis, Ivanisevic, the young Agassi, etc. To prove my point, name the things that Agassi did to go from being a choker up until he won his first Grand Slam. It took him five years to win his first. What was his problem? His terrible tactics or techniques? No, actually he didn't change a thing in those departments. His mental game improved. He believed he could win. His forehand was the same, his backhand was the same, and his tactics stayed the same. His choking issues were all in his mind. However, his tactics and techiniques were already very strong. Believe me, I am not saying you are wrong at all. I am saying though that something has to seperate the pros and it tends to be their minds. They are all technically and tactically sound.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennis Angel View Post
    There is a fundamental similarity between martial arts and tennis. It is the "secret ingredient" which is so simple, but which most players and coaches fail to recognize. Once understood it unlocks the mystery of how the pros play with such force and speed. It can be applied to anyone's game to create phenomenal results and free him to play like the pros.


    One of the reasons why I am trying to define what is tennis all about is that is transparent to people who are very involved in tennis .What are the "ingredients" which consist of and how are interrelated. There is nothing mystical about playing quality tennis.To play quality tennis one has to obey to certain rules, and systematicaly and persitently implement these rules.In that way he/she will climb step by step to higher and higher position.Nothing will come all of the sudden or out of nowhere.It is very long process in which one has to be very committed.I will illustrate what I mean on an example of a tennis serve:

    At the start you try to learn serving motion.It is motion of throwing.One learn parts like:toss, swing, loop, leg action, reaching up to a ball, position of racket at impact, etc.To do it one uses analytical and syntetical approach.The goal of this phase of learning is to acquire gross movement which is similar to serving motion.

    Once gross movement is acquired, one tries to control a ball:direction, length, placement.At the same time improves each part of serving motion as well as whole.At that time one is taugh mental part of serving (as approach to the position one is going to serve from he has to bring himself in state to be physically relaxed and mentally alert)At that time starts to learn serving motion for slice serve.

    As one has more and more control over gross movement one is adding technical details, and at the same time increasing criteria for measuring ball characteristics such as:direction, length, placement.One can control slice serving motion, and starts to learn topspin serve

    As one becomes physically stronger through bioogical development and physical conditioning he tries to increase speed of serve.He increases precision of a serve by increasing criteria.Slice serves is tested for:direction, length, spin.One has control of topspin serve motion.

    Each year one makes progress with his flat serve:by increasing speed, precision and consistency,by his slice serve:improving placement and spin, by topsin serve:increasing length and bounce of a ball after hitting a ground.


    At that moment one adds additional mental component by adding stress (try to start point by hitting first serve in marked field, playing point with having just one serve, ace is specially rewarded and so on)


    All these improvements are results of improvements in technique,physical conditiong (as a whole or parts of body), and mental preparation (relaxation through concentration, visualization).

    This illustration shows that there is nothing mystical about becoming quality tennis player, but quality, persistent and committed practice.There are not short cuts,but long, devoted quality work.

    Even one is fully concentrated and committed to the task there is not insurance that one will reach desired heights, but if one does not recognize and respect basic tennis laws there is not chance that one will reach these heights no matter how an individual is talented.



    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 03:01 PM.

  13. #43

    Easy Does It

    My point about martial arts has nothing to do with tennis being "mystical", although I enjoyed the humorous "scenes we'd like to see" description by Tennisking1 of a Kung Fu tennis match - very funny! My reference had to do with the physics of movement in martial arts as it relates to force and acceleration in the tennis swing. If you want to know what I'm talking about please read this page on my website:

    http://www.tennisteacher.org/Lucy/ABOUT_THE_METHOD.html

    Tennis is NOT complicated and difficult to learn or to understand. Rather than forcing elaborate computations, explanations and justifications as most coaches, parents and players themselves do to make tennis complicated and difficult, a truly gifted coach simplifies mechanics and frees the player to act instinctively, relying on the being rather than the mind and the body to reach peak performance. All pros use the same basics of technique, then put their own interpretation on their game. It has always been this way and continues with today's greatest players. The tennis teaching methodology based on how to play like the pros keeps it simple for players at all levels; as the player progresses on a gradient scale of learning his performance rises, but the simplicity of the basics remains up to the highest levels of ability. In this methodology more time is spent on eliminating barriers and simplifying every aspect of the game rather than complicating and burdoning the player mentally, physically and spiritually. To learn more about how tennis teaching has actually evolved go to:

    http://www.moderntenniscoaches.com/f...e26b973d8ff936

    The essence of tennis IS very simple. It is neither about technique and mechanics nor about the mind. It is about the spirit which drives the body and the mind towards optimal performance. It is what puts players in the zone, what makes it all come together and what makes one love tennis and love life.
    Last edited by Tennis Angel; 08-16-2009 at 11:08 PM.
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennis Angel View Post
    My point about martial arts has nothing to do with tennis being "mystical", although I enjoyed the humorous "scenes we'd like to see" description by Tennisking1 of a Kung Fu tennis match - very funny! My reference had to do with the physics of movement in martial arts as it relates to force and acceleration in the tennis swing. If you want to know what I'm talking about please read this page on my website:

    http://www.tennisteacher.org/Lucy/ABOUT_THE_METHOD.html

    Tennis is NOT complicated and difficult to learn or to understand. Rather than forcing elaborate computations, explanations and justifications as most coaches, parents and players themselves do to make tennis complicated and difficult, a truly gifted coach simplifies mechanics and frees the player to act instinctively, relying on the being rather than the mind and the body to reach peak performance. All pros use the same basics of technique, then put their own interpretation on their game. It has always been this way and continues with today's greatest players. The tennis teaching methodology based on how to play like the pros keeps it simple for players at all levels; as the player progresses on a gradient scale of learning his performance rises, but the simplicity of the basics remains up to the highest levels of ability. In this methodology more time is spent on eliminating barriers and simplifying every aspect of the game rather than complicating and burdoning the player mentally, physically and spiritually. To learn more about how tennis teaching has actually evolved go to:

    http://www.moderntenniscoaches.com/f...e26b973d8ff936

    The essence of tennis IS very simple. It is neither about technique and mechanics nor about the mind. It is about the spirit which drives the body and the mind towards optimal performance. It is what puts players in the zone, what makes it all come together and what makes one love tennis and love life.
    I actually like that explanation. To be honest, that would definitely be what takes the very best to the top. That way of thinking comes with maturity. Lots of practice, playing, and mental preparation is the only way to get to that level. Those thoughts can be applied to anything in life. You are definitely right though. However, how could I resist a Van Damme movie pitch? Maybe you should have been working with me when I was on tour Tennis Angel, you might have been able to help me control that rotten temper I had.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    ..... and Boris Becker's eastern to semi-western forehand service grip, but those two had it in the mental ability.

    You did not mean eastern to semi-western forehand grip, you ment universal (semi-continental )grip?

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