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Thread: the unit turn

  1. #1

    the unit turn

    Hello Oscar, I have read your book "You can play tennis in 2 hours", and found it very instructive. I find that most people who claim to follow or teach your method are misinterpreting your advice on preparation. You have clearly said that the body reacts first, and the arms react later. I take that to mean that the unit turn is done early, albeit with the racquet still not taken back fully (it is still facing forward). The final take back, racquet head drop, and the forward swing are done as late as possible, so the ball is hit at the right spot with one continuous motion - right? An although you say to do this after the bounce, well, I take it that one has to adjust a little based on depth and pace. What people seem think is that the unit turn is also performed after the bounce, and that in my opinion is an incorrect interpretation (except perhaps for really short balls). Could you clarify this for me (and everyone else)? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    32
    You are correct, tennisplayer. The unit turn occurs while you are tracking the ball. Usually you have to run to one side of the court to get to the ball, so your body has obviously turned. Some players like Agassi keeps the tip of the racquet still pointing to the whereabouts of the ball while they do that. To me it is obvious that he tracks the ball this way, instead of taking the hand away, as it would happen in an early backswing. The interesting part is that some of the top players get to the ball with the outside foot helping open the body towards the ball, opening the unit turn as the arm is going back, thus keeping the racquet near the ball, and achieving a spring that helps bring the arm forward (and across). Of course every top player is a bit different in this, but the technique is very interesting and merits further study. Beyond that, there are other interesting things some top players do today (and have been doing for a while) that are distinctly opposed to the teachings of conventional coaching.
    More about it in my book.
    Oscar Wegner
    www.TennisTeacher.com
    THE LEADER in modern tennis teaching methodology.

  3. #3
    Thanks again, Oscar! For some reason, this part is not being interpreted correctly by folks reading your book. Hope this feedback is useful!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by tennisplayer
    Thanks again, Oscar! For some reason, this part is not being interpreted correctly by folks reading your book. Hope this feedback is useful!
    Good observation TennisPlayer, this is in fact the case also with the folks I know locally who are instructing their juniors using Wegner/Modern Method. They preach only the part about counting to five in your head after the bounce and the results are disastrous, of the hundreds or more juniors who have been instructed in this way, only 2 or 3 have even made it to "B" level, perhaps this is one of the reasons. My kids who are instructed in the "obsolete" conventional method own them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    32
    Tennis Parent, check with John Carpenter in St. Louis (618-604-7118, and see how those statistics you mention are the other way around. I checked his methods personally, last summer. His students, all ages, are doing phenomenal. Could there be some missaplication in your area?
    Oscar Wegner
    www.TennisTeacher.com
    THE LEADER in modern tennis teaching methodology.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar
    Tennis Parent, check with John Carpenter in St. Louis (618-604-7118, and see how those statistics you mention are the other way around. I checked his methods personally, last summer. His students, all ages, are doing phenomenal. Could there be some missaplication in your area?
    Perhaps so. Your adherents here use your material faithfully, but maybe something is lost in translation, they actually overcomplicate the instruction, both high school teams they coach in your method are near the cellar in the league. The other teams coaches who use conventional method make much fun of this. It is painful to see, and I would really like to help them, but the fact that I use the conventional method succesfully against their proteges has made it difficult. These are folks whom you know and communicate with regularly.
    Last edited by TennisParent; 05-09-2006 at 11:47 AM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by TennisParent
    My kids who are instructed in the "obsolete" conventional method own them.
    Yeah, I also teach in the "obsolete" method. LOL

    My kid is killing the ball. In fact, I use a combination of various professional coaches tips, methods, and suggestions to teach "modern" tennis.

    So does this mean I have no Daddy? Or is it that I have a lot of Daddy's? Who is your Daddy? lol

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