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  1. #1

    Parent teaching his kids to play T

    Greetings, does anyone know of a stress-free way to teach kids to play tennis?
    St Martins Old Boy

  2. #2
    I saw this item somewhere . I hope it helps.

    Dear Tennis Parent, (That’s when you’re trying to teach your child how to play tennis.)
    I remember trying to teach my children how to play tennis. It wasn’t a particularly good experience. Here’s why . . .

    First, I was never more than an average tennis player myself. Sure, I could play but I didn’t know the REASONS why some shots went IN and others went OUT. Hey, if I knew how to do all the strokes I wouldn’t have been average, would I!

    Second, I was the kids’ father. “What does he know?” is a common response when a father tries to teach his own kids. When my shots hit the net it became a fair question.

    Now, I’ve found a better way. I’ve passed the teaching bit on to a professional coach instructor, Tomaz Mencinger.

    Now, we watch a short tennis coaching video together at home, then we go on the court where the kids practise what we just saw Tomaz do on the video clip. I’m on the sideline cheering them on.

    Tomaz is their coach now. Somehow his body moves, racquet techniques and foot placements all seem more coordinated than I could ever manage. The kids pick up the right moves very quickly. Sometimes we hit REPLAY, but not often.

    Here’s the best part. I’m no longer a grouch or critic in my kids’ eyes. Now I’m their enthusiastic encouraging Dad. And the family stress level is now down to zero. I’m now the loving Dad who got a personal tennis coach for my kids. All this for us$37. That’s for all 37 lessons. When two kids learn it’s still only $37.

    Click here to read more about how I managed to do all this.
    http://9e50fv7u12x8s7eiqcwdvg0gdp.ho...COACHCLICKBANK

    I hope your kids go on to enjoy their tennis. It’s the game for life. Being taught the right moves when they’re young is the best gift any father can give his children. You can try the coaching package for 8 weeks before you decide to keep it. Not bad, huh!

    Brian Morris

    PS: The whole package is electronic. So it arrives in your email box within minutes. Quick: ask your kids if they’d like to learn tennis with Tomaz as their personal coach.

  3. #3
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    I never experienced such a joy as when I taught my daughter tennis.As you two (parent and kid) make progress, I think this joy multiplies.I do not know if there is better feeling than to make professional player (and decent human being ) out of your child.The problem is that very few parents are aware of this fact at the time when is happening so they do not experience it at its fullest at the time of happening.The reason for that is enourmous stress which takes part in bringing a child up the competitive ladder.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:24 PM.

  4. #4
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    The big dilemma is who should teach your child to play tennis.

    If your ambition do not exceed recreational tennis, I would recommend that you teach your child tennis even if you know nothing about teaching tennis because:

    - your main goal is to have quality time with your child
    - you will be much more attentive to your child needs
    - maybe you will learn tennis yourself

    Of course, you will have to read simple handbook, "How to teach tennis".During the preparation process (and after) teach your child different coordination exercises during which you two will have fun, and at the same time it will develop your child motor abilities.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-08-2009 at 11:28 AM.

  5. #5
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    What to do if you as a parent have very high aspirations for your child;in other words if you see him/her one day as professional tennis player.

    This is very tough question.Is it better that you teach him or hire professional teacher?Dificulty of decision corresponds with difficulty of a tennis as a sport; not to mention to become professional tennis player.The best illustration to support what I am talking about is that very, very few tennis coaches teach their children tennis, and try to make them professional tennis players.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-08-2009 at 11:29 AM.

  6. #6
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    There are very few exceptionsThe best examples are mothers/coaches:Maleva and Bondarenko who coached their daughters to formidable professionals heights.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-08-2009 at 11:29 AM.

  7. #7
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    So what are my recommendations based on my experience as a father/coach.

    First of all I must be sincere, and say that I have another daughter, I would never do it again, especially as I did first time totally unprepared in a sense like:how much does it cost, how much energy and time is needed, how everything has to be set up around the player etc.

    I was well prepared in tennis sense:techniques and tactics.This is not enough because to bring a child up to professional tennis has to be approached as a complex business project, and even then one is not sure that is going to succeed.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-08-2009 at 11:30 AM.

  8. #8
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    Don't forget Hingis! (Even though when I was hitting with her at Hopman, all Melanie did was feed a ball in from the side.) Seems like you know some things Bubo. You realize too that most of these girls that make it to the top have a special quality that is obvious. The one thing that I saw with Hingis was her ability to be there early and to have the wrist action of a male player. She could turn the ball at the last second like very few I have hit with. Male or female. Very athletic girl. As for the topic question. If you are going to attept to coach your kids, make sure you use proper technique from the very first day. No forehand grip serves or forehand grip volleys. Once that is ingrained and they have been allowed to have bad technique, it will be hard to get them to change to the correct techniques, especially if they have begun to play competitively. It is better to start them off slowly and correctly than to let them have bad mechanics just because they can win a match with it when they are young. They will eventually hit a wall and be unable to beat players with good techniques. It is called good technique for a reason. And biggest of all, smile a lot and have fun with the kids. Don't push too hard as the drive to be good must come from inside of the player. Not from the parent.








    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    There are very few exceptionsThe best examples are mothers/coaches:Maleva and Bondarenko who coached their daughters to formidable professionals heights.

  9. #9
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    in practice, did you ever play a set against Hingis and what was the score?

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=Lawn Tennis;15948]in practice, did you ever play a set against Hingis and what was the score?[/QUOT


    I beat her 6-1, 6-1 a number of times. She could get a couple of games. She tended to play some of the better juniors a lot as she could beat them but they would give her a decent match. Sukwha Yung was her favorite whipping post. He was one of the better juniors in the U.S.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    Don't forget Hingis!

    I did not forget Hingis.I mentioned mothers Maleva and Bondarenko on purpose because former brought three daughters, and latter two daughters to professional tennis which is hard to comprehend.



    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-08-2009 at 11:30 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    I did not forget Hingis.I mentioned mothers Maleva and Bondarenko on purpose because former brought three daughters, and latter two daughters to professional tennis which is hard to comprehend.
    Alright Bubo, I have to ask. Are you from Eastern Europe originally? You know quite a few names from that area that most people don't. The Maleevas were quite phenomenal to say the least. They all made it into the top 15 and stayed there quite a while. Especially Maggie. I used to work with a kid named Dimitri Sitak. Does the name ring a bell? I hit with Goran Prpic a couple of times too. There were really some good players from over there. I coached with a guy named Davor who was from Croatia for a while and he was quite good. There is no doubt that parents can teach there kids correctly as long as they understand technique. That's why I believe parents should take a technique lesson or two or pickup some serious instructional videos before they make the attempt to coach. I hate seeing a frying pan western grip on a serve or a volley though. AAARGH! And if the child has those grips and is already playing tournaments, it is so hard to get them to change as they are so fearful of losing. Tells you something about Sampras going to the one hander on his backhand at 14 huh? Scared him to death for the first couple of months I bet.....

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    (Even though when I was hitting with her at Hopman, all Melanie did was feed a ball in from the side.)
    Are you serious or are you just pulling my leg?


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:25 PM.

  14. #14
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    Why am saying this?Because nobody who invested so much work, money, energy, nerves would let anyone to lead a tennis training.

    In the process of bringing a child up competitive ladder is like being behind enemy lines in the war;one is surrounded by people who do not mean you well.
    Melanie does not look like someone who is so naive, and who would let somebody else take over tennis training.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:25 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    Why am saying this?Because nobody who invested so much work, money, energy, nerves would let anyone to lead a tennis training.

    In the process of bringing a child up competitive ladder is like being behind enimy lines in the war;one is surrounded by people who do not mean you well.
    Melanie does not look like someone who is so naive, and who would let somebody else take over tennis training.
    Let's call Melanie her manager. She set up training times and had Martina on a schedule and traveled with her. When it came down to actually coaching her, she did not. I am being serious. That is why if I were hitting with her, Jimmy Brown or Alvero would be behind her telling her to stay down on the ball or step up or whatever. Sorry, I don't mean to downplay Melanie's important role, but she is not some great tennis player or coach. She was one heck of a manager though. Or, let me rephrase that. She was a great motivator and manager for Martina. Had it only been Martina and Melanie hitting everyday and Melanie had to be her hitting partner, I doubt you would have heard much about Martina Hingis. Anything that Melanie learned was from being on the court with other coaches while they worked with Martina. Now if Melanie didn't like the way things were going with Martina's practice or she felt like things needed to go a different way, she interjected like a manager would, but the tennis coaching was done by others.......

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