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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    You realize too that most of these girls that make it to the top have a special quality that is obvious. The one thing that I saw with Hingis was her ability to be there early and to have the wrist action of a male player. She could turn the ball at the last second like very few I have hit with. Male or female. Very athletic girl.
    I agree with you that all these girls who became professional tennis players are talented, and the higher to the top they are more talented.There is not substitute for child¨s talent.

    I do not agree with you about Hingis qualities.She had very good anticipation so she was able to read opponent balls, and be there early, variety of shots, and court geometry.I would never say for her that she is athletic girl.Athletic girl for me are Clijsters, sister Wiliams, but not Hingis.As a matter of fact her lack of power was obvious.

    One can compare males and females of the same age till about 14 years of age.All the other there is no comparison between female and male players of same status in tennis or in any other sport.

    She was able to disguise a ball because she was there early, but it is a little bit overexaggerated to say that she could hold shot to a last moment, and that she could change direction by flick of a wrist.


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    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:26 PM.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    I agree with you that all these girls who became professional tennis players are talented, and the higher to the top they are more talented.There is not substitute for child¨s talent.

    I do not agree with you about Hingis qualities.She had very good anticipation so she was able to read opponent balls, and be there early, variety of shots, and court geometry.I would never say for her that she is athletic girl.Athletic girl for me are Clijsters, sister Wiliams, but not Hingis.As a matter of fact her lack of power was obvious.

    One can compare males and females of the same age till about 14 years of age.All the other there is no comparison between female and male players of same status in tennis or in any other sport.

    She was able to disduise a ball because she was there early, but it is a little bit overexaggerated to say that she could hold shot to a last moment, and that she could change direction by flick of a wrist.
    Ever been on the court with Hingis? I have a thousand times as well as Mary Pierce, Jennifer Capriati, Chandra Rubin, and the guys list is endless. I know an athlete when I see one. She can turn the ball at the last second. It's crazy. Her athleticism is what got her to #1 in the world. Not her power. Two different words with two different meanings. Her balance is phenomenal and her speed and eyesight are exceptional. I watched her beat every ITF ranked junior at Saddlebrook that was a boy, regardless of age. We had the #3 ranked male player in the world and she beat him. Sukwa Young used to take a whipping from her and he was one of the best juniors in the world. And yes, she beat numerous college players that came there. A male that is #300 in the world is a great player and would easily beat her, but that #300 male beats most everybody he plays other than the very top players and those close in ranking to him. Hingis' hand-eye coordination is phenomenal. Heck, go down to Saddlebrook Resort and play a match with her. I promise you she will change your mind quickly. She can still play. She was #1 in the world for quite a while for a reason and made many millions of dollars for a reason. Burnout was her biggest issue. Not the "tremendous power" of today's game. The biggest shot I ever saw in men's tennis from the forehand side was not Sampras (who also hit with us at Saddlebrook) or Agassi or Courier. It was Jimmy Arias. That forehand was sick. Absolutely sick. I warmed him up for some of his matches during the Nuveen Masters Tour series and the pace from him was like nothing I had seen before and it was effortless. I spent three years on the tour too, so I saw my fair share of forehands. Jimmy was 40 years old at the time and his highest ranking was was #4 in the world back in 1984 or so. By the way, Capriati hit the ball as hard as any of todays girls and Hingis constantly beat her in practice. Sorry, but the Hingis not being an super athlete does not float in any boat you try and put it in........

  3. #18

    Parent coaching

    Patience and dedication. taught by my dad since 4

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheila32 View Post
    Patience and dedication. taught by my dad since 4
    You have great dad!These are great qualities.

    The problem is that high competitve environment is very stressful, and even the best persons cannot control themselves all the time.



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    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:27 PM.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    You have great dad!These are great qualities.

    The problem is that high competitve environment is very stressful, and even the best persons cannot control themselves all the time.

    I remember one case from $110,000 WTA tournament in Vancouver in 2004.
    My player and I were in the gym of the tennis club where the tournament was held.Father and daughter Bartoli were in gym too.My player warmed up for coming match.After my player finished match we came back to the gym so that my player could cool down and strech out.Bartoli were still there.At one moment Marion could not take any longer, and started to cry and ran out of the gym.The father stayed in there.They were avoiding each other for the rest of the day, but next day everything was normal like nothing happened.


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:27 PM.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    Ever been on the court with Hingis? I have a thousand times as well as Mary Pierce, Jennifer Capriati, Chandra Rubin, and the guys list is endless. I know an athlete when I see one. She can turn the ball at the last second. Her athleticism is what got her to #1 in the world. Not her power. Two different words with two different meanings. Her balance is phenomenal and her speed and eyesight are exceptional. .
    I have never been on court with Martina Hingis, but I still think that she is not modele athlete.I can agree that she is better athlete than Mary Pierce, Jennifer Capriati or Chanda Rubin,but not as good as Kim Clijsters or Venus Williams.

    There are five basic physical components:coordination, speed ,endurance, flexibility and strength.I am aware that she has had very good balance and hand/eye coordination.These are segments of coordination.She was very good in first four components, but her strength does not match her caliber as a tennis player.

    Without sufficient strength she did not have sufficient power .


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    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-18-2009 at 02:27 PM.

  7. #22
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    For the moment I will step aside from Martina Hingis and suggest in my opinion the most celebrated parent who taught their kid was Richard Williams. Here is a man with limited educational ability and yet was clever enough to emulate what he saw on tv, tennis tapes and books then brought that to the courts in Compton Ca. to give his daughters very elementary basics of how to hit tennis balls.

    I taught my kids how to play and they are both very good tennis players although my daughter doesn't enjoy tennis as much as she likes swimming, so swimming it is for her. The one element anyone needs to have to be successful is patience. Far too many believe if something is simple to them, it must be simple.

    My son had a hard time controlling the ball because aside from what I was trying to explain to him, he wanted to hit like the pros from day one. According to him, I wasn't getting to the big hitting lessons quick enough.
    He wasn't the least bit interested in building from the ground up. That was my biggest challenge. I came up with a plan to deal with that. One day Iask if he wanted to hit the courts. Five minutes later, he was in the car ready to go. But I made him leave his racquet in the car. Puzzled of course, we actually stood on the court with a tennis ball and no racquets.

    Yep we played Hand ball with a tennis ball. He loved it, he was able to see how form made the difference in shot production. My Son & I have a very loving relationship. I explained to him that I wanted him to trust me and if he would just give me one month of doing it my way, he would see a vast improvement on how he controlled the ball.

    Do you all remember Alexander Stevenson? I believe it was her mother that made tennis miserable for her. Has she just stayed out of the mix, Alex might still be playing today. Aside from recognizing how good your kid is, I think it's more important to recognize how effective you are.




    .
    The only acceptable loss is when your opponent was better than you on that given day.
    It is never acceptable to lose when your opponent was not.

  8. #23
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    [QUOTE=tennisking1;15953]
    Quote Originally Posted by Lawn Tennis View Post
    in practice, did you ever play a set against Hingis and what was the score?[/QUOT


    I beat her 6-1, 6-1 a number of times. She could get a couple of games. She tended to play some of the better juniors a lot as she could beat them but they would give her a decent match. Sukwha Yung was her favorite whipping post. He was one of the better juniors in the U.S.
    wow. i always wondered how a mid-high ranked atp player would do against a top ten wta player. that must be great practice and quite the challenge for her; bet it's probably a big reason she did so well. do you think Hingis would beat the 1500th ranked atp player?

  9. #24
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    [QUOTE=Lawn Tennis;16228]
    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post

    wow. i always wondered how a mid-high ranked atp player would do against a top ten wta player. that must be great practice and quite the challenge for her; bet it's probably a big reason she did so well. do you think Hingis would beat the 1500th ranked atp player?
    That would be a close one. The one thing about Hingis is that she was very quick. If she were playing a guy who was just a backboard, I could see her winning. However, the guys who can really hit the ball and have a big serve would be tough for her to beat.

  10. #25
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    that makes sense

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    As for the topic question. If you are going to attept to coach your kids, make sure you use proper technique from the very first day. No forehand grip serves or forehand grip volleys. Once that is ingrained and they have been allowed to have bad technique, it will be hard to get them to change to the correct techniques, especially if they have begun to play competitively. It is better to start them off slowly and correctly than to let them have bad mechanics just because they can win a match with it when they are young. They will eventually hit a wall and be unable to beat players with good techniques. It is called good technique for a reason. And biggest of all, smile a lot and have fun with the kids. Don't push too hard as the drive to be good must come from inside of the player. Not from the parent.
    I agree on this with you completely.If parents have competitve ambitions for their child, they have to hire quality coach from the very beginning to teach him/her proper technique.Something learned incorrectly at young age it will be imposiible to change later on.

    I will support this by an example.There was one girl by name Jelena Pandzic from my country (my daughter¨s age).At national championship at 12 and under she lost in 5 games in five matches.She won Orange Bawl 14 and under, and had great chances for great tennis career:I did not see anybody that can practice so indoustrously, and concentrated at so young age.
    But, she had problem:her coach taught her to use continental grip for forehand groundstroke.She taught her to use grip which he used for forehand what was very wrong.Once, when realized mistake, it was way too late.Even withher unbelievable committment to practice could not change it, and normally she did not reach ranking even close to her capacity (her best ranking was around 140 WTA).


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-23-2009 at 01:05 PM.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    I agree on this with you completely.If parents have competitve ambitions for their child, they have to hire quality coach from the very beginning to teach him/her proper technique.Something learned incorrectly at young age it will be imposiible to change later on.

    I will support this by an example.There was one girl by name Jelena Pandzic from my country (my daughter¨s age).At national championship at 12 and under she lost in 5 games in five matches.She won Orange Bawl 14 and under, and had great chances for great tennis career:I did not see anybody that can practice so indoustrously, and concentrated at so young age.
    But, she had problem:her coach taught her to use continental grip for forehand groundstroke.She taught her to use grip which he used for forehand what was very wrong.Once, when realized mistake, it was way too late.Even withher unbelievable committment to practice could not change it, and normally she did not reach ranking even close to her capacity (her best ranking was around 140 WTA).


    www.mytennistory.com

    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Yes, there is a lot of poor technique training going on and it seems to have been allowed just so that the child can have fun. However, it is a lot more fun when you are playing high level tennis and you have good technique. I have a friend who has a tremendous continental forehand, and he hits it tremendously hard, but he is a serve and volleyer. He doesn't waste much time on the baseline. If Pandzic was a baseliner, I just have to laugh. I am surprised how she was allowed to play so long with a continental forehand grip. You should see how many semi-western forehand service grips there are over here in America. GEEZ!!!!!!! It's crazy. Same with the volley. I have seen so many backhand volley grips that face the sky when the player turns. It is terrible. No wonder there are so few serve and volleyers out there anymore. I promise you, I always fix those issues first. From the very beginning.
    Last edited by tennisking1; 08-18-2009 at 04:02 PM.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    I watched her beat every ITF ranked junior at Saddlebrook that was a boy, regardless of age. We had the #3 ranked male player in the world and she beat him. Sukwa Young used to take a whipping from her and he was one of the best juniors in the world. And yes, she beat numerous college players that came there...

    I know from my own experience that good female tennis player can play very fine tennis.I knew times when I gave my daughter 0/30 in each game, and I bit her.Soon after that (few years time) it was the other way around, and after that it was nonsense to play points.This proves my before mentioned hypothesis that first ones who leave the race are the ones who do not have sound technique.I was physically stronger than my daughter, but she was so much better tehnicaly that after some time it was no contest.

    I can only imagine how well player was Hingis in her prime time, but still is difficult to believe that she could beat top class world male junior.It is big difference between male and female tennis.

    You say that it would be close match between 1500 ATP player and Martina Hingis.The top world class junior is by far better than 1500 ATP player.



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    In Depth Description of Bringing a Child Up a Competitive Ladder with Advices and Recommendations
    Last edited by Bubo; 08-24-2009 at 07:30 AM.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubo View Post
    I know from my own experience that good female tennis player can play very fine tennis.I knew times when I gave my daughter 0/30 in each game, and I bit her.Soon after that (few years time) it was the other way around, and after that it was nonsense to play points.This proves my before mentioned hypothesis that first ones who leave the race are the ones who do not have sound technique.I was physically stronger than my daughter, but she was so much better tehnicaly that after some time it was no contest.

    I can only imagine how well player was Hingis in her prime time, but still is difficult to believe that she could beat top class world male junior.It is big difference between male and female tennis.

    You say that it would be close match between 1500 ATP player and Martina Hingis.The top world class junior is better than 1500 ATP player.
    It just depends on the day. I worked out with Christian Ruud a few times when he was the number one junior player and I know he could have beaten her, but there were times when I know she would have beaten him. If he did not get his first serve in, he was toast. Also, you have to think about matchups. Put Hingis up against someone like a Michael Chang, he will beat her soundly, but it would be a much closer match than her playing Sampras. I watched Christian Ruud lose practice matches to a number of guys who were ranked in the 1200 range when he was the number 1 junior in the world. When you get to that level, you better bring your A game. That 1500 ranked player may have been on the tour for three weeks and was about to break through and become a top 100 player. It's too hard to call. I know for sure that men beat women most of the time, but it was Hingis' tenacity and her competitive nature that kept her number one in the world for nearly four years. Her comeback was for her to have fun and see what happened. She was not the same player after 2000. Besides, most of the guys avoided her at practice. They didn't want to chance a loss. I know Dimitri Sitak lost to her at practice one day when he had just turned pro. He was the number one 16 year old in the world and Russia's top junior. Boy was he mad..........

  15. #30
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    parents teaching kids

    Quote Originally Posted by tennisking1 View Post
    It just depends on the day. I worked out with Christian Ruud a few times when he was the number one junior player and I know he could have beaten her, but there were times when I know she would have beaten him. If he did not get his first serve in, he was toast. Also, you have to think about matchups. Put Hingis up against someone like a Michael Chang, he will beat her soundly, but it would be a much closer match than her playing Sampras. I watched Christian Ruud lose practice matches to a number of guys who were ranked in the 1200 range when he was the number 1 junior in the world. When you get to that level, you better bring your A game. That 1500 ranked player may have been on the tour for three weeks and was about to break through and become a top 100 player. It's too hard to call. I know for sure that men beat women most of the time, but it was Hingis' tenacity and her competitive nature that kept her number one in the world for nearly four years. Her comeback was for her to have fun and see what happened. She was not the same player after 2000. Besides, most of the guys avoided her at practice. They didn't want to chance a loss. I know Dimitri Sitak lost to her at practice one day when he had just turned pro. He was the number one 16 year old in the world and Russia's top junior. Boy was he mad..........
    I agree with you! tenacity and hard work! is the only way!!!!

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