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  1. #16
    I teach children from the ages of 4 right up to adults. The most important thing lots of variety. Maybe spend 30 minutes on a court with your child and do ten different things such as dodgeball, hitting ball up on racket, hitting ball over net on forehand/backhand into target area, rallying up to 50 shots, 10 successful serves, volleys into target area, etc.

  2. #17
    Private lessons are not a good idea at this age. It is very intimidating for the child. They are better to be in a group with friends where they can interact and have fun and exercise

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    17
    Well we have decide to place focus on the fun of tennis. He loves doing mini tournaments as it is a lot of fun and he has made a lot of friends.
    Last edited by Elize; 06-03-2011 at 05:42 AM.

  4. #19
    The way in which children perceive and evaluate themselves is one of the most important factors that determine their choice of activity, and their level of motivation to participate in that activity. A child’s level of self-confidence in sport will determine the amount of effort and persistence exerted in adverse conditions. High levels of tennis confidence will contribute to a child’s overall self-esteem (sense of personal worth- pride/shame). Coaches must be able to observe and evaluate the behaviour of their athletes in order to provide assistance to those who require it. Low self-confidence behaviours include avoiding activities, giving up easily when learning new skills, exerting minimal effort during practice and games, setting unrealistically high goals, attributing success to luck and failure to lack of ability and adopting strategies to avoid failure (making excuses, feeling sick, etc.). Those with high levels of tennis confidence tend to try harder, and will persist under challenging conditions until they reach their goal.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    17

    Ownership of tennis - A follow up

    Quote Originally Posted by Lawn Tennis View Post
    awesome! so good to hear your son will certainly reach a fickle stage like that again, so just do what works (the same thing). he'll come around again. hey keep us informed on how things go.. i'm interested.
    We moved house last year and needless to say we had to get another tennis coach. The new coach is much younger and has a totally different approach to
    tennis. My son also started playing tournaments as well. It was a lot of new things to get used to.

    Last year my son said he does not like it when my husband goes to tournaments because he gets nervous and is worried he'll make a mistake - he keeps on looking at my husband after every point. Which to me is not the way it should be. Needless to say hubby was not happy and said he'll not go to tournaments until my son can play better tennis. My son is happy that I take him and he play his matches.

    My son will not be the best under 12 player but I need him to enjoy what he is doing and not worry about his mistakes.

  6. #21
    Wayne Bryan, father of the Bryan twins, has a great book out on how he raised his kids, and it wasn't all about practicing tennis. No 1 objective was to have fun, as many have said already. Good book, I loaned it out some time ago and it never came back......guess that's a positive vote for the book. Hopefully lots have read it now!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    17
    I totally agree that fun should be priority number 1.

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