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  1. #16
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    Yeah, you can hit low to high with an eastern forehand, take the ball way in front of you, and you still get that top/sidespin mix.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 03White View Post
    LT, you put backspin and topspin on a ball @ the same time? Or by slice you mean sidespin?
    Yes, I mean the '8 to 2' kind of slice - like the slice serve. They must not call it the slice serve in your area.

    Quote Originally Posted by clock- View Post
    Yeah, you can hit low to high with an eastern forehand, take the ball way in front of you, and you still get that top/sidespin mix.
    right, but is it as effective?

  3. #18
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    It's faster than my second serve most of the time. Not that I have a huge second serve, but it puts things in perspective.

  4. #19
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    Well, no they do, but they also call slice backspin..
    So you brush up and across the ball? I've never tried that, I kind of just stick to plain old topspin...
    Do any of the pro's do this? Or is this just the ww forehand?
    I'm confused...lol

  5. #20
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    Yes sometimes pros hit with a little slice in the forehand - not sure about the bh. In particular, the inside-out fh can have a little more slice than others. You hit with slice too. It's pretty much impossible to hit exactly from '6 to 12'. As for referring to any side-spin as a slice.. I always thought that was okay.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawn Tennis View Post
    Good point Alex.. though I do wonder if mal-j was referring more toward the intermediate skill levels.
    No, intermediate players can be proficient as well. Obviously you don't have to be nadal or federer to be proficient with your grip. I know some older intermediate players who have hit continental grip all their lives but somehow manage to tackle high balls with ease. I was just giving federer and nadal as contrasting examples that everyone can relate to.
    "The depressing thing about tennis is that no matter how good I get, Iíll never be as good as a wall."

    "Whoever said, ĎItís not whether you win or lose that counts,í probably lost."

  7. #22
    Hi LeeD
    I don't want to labour a point my friend but you are still wrong.
    Of course I have heard of the karate chop - and the pork chop. It is something that is used in martial arts due to the fact that the area of impact is smaller and can hit pressure points on the body (a bit like a stilletoe heel doing more damage to a floor than an elephants foot) and not because it is stronger. In fact you don't have to use too much power with it. In karate you actually use more punches and kicks.
    Please consider this. When you serve what grip do you use? Almost everyone uses a continental. When you serve you turn the racket and hit the ball leading with your palm do you not? Which is the most powerful stroke in tennis? The serve - hit with the palm. It doesn't matter if you are hitting from the side or anywhere it is a physiological fact that the palm is stronger.

    The following is an extract from a research report carried out by the University of Genova in Genoa Italy.

    "The Western grip requires a strong wrist and perfect timing to avoid wrist injury as it involves holding the racket at a different inclination, the researchers note.

    Non-professional tennis players should understand that "extreme grips, such as the Western, may cause ulnar-side wrist injuries," Tagliafico said.

    His team assessed hand grip and wrist injury type among 370 division III and division IV tennis players over an 18 month period. The injured and non-injured players showed no significant differences in body mass, years of practice, weekly training hours, racket weight, or string type used.

    Of the 50 injured players, 12 reported using the Eastern grip and 38 reported using the semi-Western and Western grips.

    The Eastern grip players were significantly older (42 years on average) and played tennis for significantly longer (20 years on average) than did semi-Western and Western grip users who were 22 years old on average and had played tennis for an average of 8 years."

  8. #23
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    is there a classification for those of us who use a grip between eastern and semi-western?

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawn Tennis View Post
    is there a classification for those of us who use a grip between eastern and semi-western?
    Hybrid eastern I think
    "The depressing thing about tennis is that no matter how good I get, Iíll never be as good as a wall."

    "Whoever said, ĎItís not whether you win or lose that counts,í probably lost."

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexLogan View Post
    Hybrid eastern I think
    That would work. You are the first person I've heard say that however.

  11. #26
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    Jan 2009
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    MaJ...
    Actually it is you who doesn't understand.
    We serve with conti or EBH side of conti because it is more aerodynamic, the swing is lead the the edge of the racket, then it opens fully to hit flat serves, if you choose.
    Same on forehand. EFH grips have the racketface fully open, so the swing is slower. SW and W grips allow the edge of the racket to lead thru the prehit, so the racket can be swung faster.
    Modern tennis, not that I do it, is all about faster swing speeds and more topspin.
    I use an extreme SW, so the ball stays in, always hits topspin, and on pressure points, I can swing away fully. Never had problems with shoetop balls, I actually prefer hitting low balls with my SW grip.
    I used EFH for most of my competitive years, finding it doesn't hit hard enough with control. You may cite Federer, and he has an extreme EFH grip, but he's one in a million. Like McEnroe's volleys, you don't adapt his style.
    You don't adapt Connor's strokes either.
    And you don't copy Karlovic backhand, OR his serve motion.
    Don't be so blind to pick up ONE player's style, when every other player doesn't adopt that style and doesn't agree with it.
    You are not Federer.

  12. #27
    Hi Lee

    I am a bit confused. First you are talking about strength and now you are going on about aerodynamics. You have made some valid points before (like about the height of the player etc.) but where are you going with this? You made a statement of fact that the side of the hand is stronger than the palm. (It still isn't by the way.) But now you are talking about another aspect of the stroke altogether.
    I am not Federer and don't play like him or try to emulate him. My grip is exactly the same as his but that is coincidence.
    My backswing and prehit don't have the racket face open, I hit low to high with consistent depth and topspin and sometimes use a windscreen wiper forehand action. I used to use a semi western all the time and can hit with more power with an eastern. I changed to an eastern about six months ago and haven't looked back. I have much more control and more options open to me.
    I am not talking about the old style eastern of Chris Evert where you finish with the head of the rachet facing the ball you have just hit.
    I have said consistently that everyone is different and what works for one person might not work for another - but for me eastern is better, for others a western might be better.
    People always go on about the "modern game" but it was only a few years ago that serve-and-volley was the modern game. In a few years time it will be something else. I just wouldn't teach all kids to use a semi or full western and ignore the eastern altogether as inferior.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal-j View Post
    People always go on about the "modern game" but it was only a few years ago that serve-and-volley was the modern game. In a few years time it will be something else. I just wouldn't teach all kids to use a semi or full western and ignore the eastern altogether as inferior.
    +1

    I think you make a very good point. While I don't think the topspin game will ever truly go away the S&V game has, I do believe variety is an under-rated skill.

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