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  1. #1

    Getting the shot right

    The coaches often say that your follow through on the forehand should be such that after you complete it, your hand should come in front of you as if you are watching the time. Same thing would probably apply to a double handed backhand.

    For moving sidewards to hit a full fledged shot, "Chin under the shoulder" is advocated for both forehand and backhand. Is there any other indicator that your sideways movement has been correct enough?- position of the feet perhaps or more specifically the outer foot being parallel to the baseline or slightly tilted towards it irrespective of the stance.

    Other players have also said that I don't bend my knees enough. Is there any indicator for that? Opening of the hips perhaps?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    173
    Right shot only comes into effect about 30% of the time when you are playing a set. Your opponent is deliberately trying to take you out of your game, so you are always compensating and adjusting for almost each and every shot.
    The correct finish on a forehand is used about 60% of the time, at most.
    On the backhand, depends on top or slice stroke, and how much.
    In tennis, for every stroke, there are at least 4 different finishes.
    The ball is moving, different spins, speeds, and placements.

  3. #3
    Thanks LeeD. That is a good insight and probably the reason why my set game leaves a lot to be desired despite having good shots.

    Supposing I were to rephrase the question. If one is doing cross court drills, how does one ensure that he is turning sideways properly, bending enough etc?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    173
    CC drills, my favorite.....
    Only criteria is the results of where your balls land, how much power and angle.
    Don't pretend only to hit CC. Your prep has to be the same for every shot, DTL or CC, so don't favor one side. Early shoulder turn, knee bend as YOU like or need it, move feet if you have time or inclination.
    Some balls, you can use a normal finish. Other balls, jammed or shorthopped, you need a Nadal like reverse finish. Finishes are different depending on incoming ball placement and spin.
    What counts is how YOUR shot goes CC, with pace, spin, depth, angle.
    Some of the best practice is one (you) against two. You hit two shots to each opponent, one DTL, once CC. Your two partners can hit where they want, but make them really hit seriously. All balls go into the singles court.
    After 15 minutes, or 50 rally balls, switch positions.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sea Pines, Hilton Head, South Carolina
    Posts
    414
    Yikes. Hiren, scrap what you have read. I work for a guy (Billy Stearns) who is considered to be possibly the top stroke teacher in the world. I have learned quite a bit from the guy and the main thing he believes in is the racquet tip touches the back on follow through. It can be done over and over and over. If you think in terms of technique and stroke production when you play, you will find that you can produce the same stroke consistently over and over. People's strokes falter when they just go out and "hit the ball". Keep the hand speed high as the racquet passes through the ball and make sure the racquet tip touches the back. I have 30 plus very highly ranked juniors who reproduce the same stroke nearly everytime whether it be in high level ITF events or in simple practice due to the fact that they make sure their form and technique is first and foremost. Work on getting the elbows high and the racquet tip to your back on both your forehand and your backhand. If you practice creating the same stroke over and over, you will become more consistent and powerful with your strokes. The key to doing this is FOOTWORK! Waist high contact point so you can create the same stroke over and over. If you don't get to the ball, you will not be able to have a consistent swing.....

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